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E-cigarette adverts could encourage children to take up tobacco, warn Cambridge scientists

http://www.cambridge-news.co.uk/e-cigarette-adverts-could-encourage-children-to-take-up-tobacco-warn-cambridge-scientists/story-29686498-detail/story.html

Adverts for e-cigarettes may encourage more children to experiment with tobacco smoking, Cambridge scientists have warned.

A team from Cambridge University found children exposed to adverts for ‘vaping’ are more likely to believe occasional smoking poses no risk to their health.

Working with colleagues from the University of North Carolina, they recruited more than 400 English children aged 11 to 16, who have never smoked or vaped before.

One group was shown adverts depicting e-cigarettes as glamorous, a second was shown adverts that portrayed them as healthy, and a third control group was shown no adverts.

Those shown the adverts were no more or no less likely than the control group to perceive tobacco smoking as appealing, and all three groups understood smoking more than 10 cigarettes a day was harmful.

However, the groups exposed to the adverts, both healthy and glamorous, were less likely to believe smoking one or two tobacco cigarettes occasionally was harmful.

There is concern the increasing exposure of children to e-cigarette adverts could be contributing to high rates of experimentation.

Dr Milica Vasiljevic from Cambridge’s from the Department of Public Health and Primary Care, said: “This is worrying, as we know even occasional tobacco smoking is bad for your health, and young people who smoke occasionally believe they are somehow immune to its effects and do not feel the need to quit.”

The group shown the ‘glamorous’ adverts also believed e-cigarette vaping to be more prevalent than the other two groups did.

Researchers also highlighted a 2014 study that showed more children aged 11 to 15 experimented with e-cigarettes than tobacco (22 per cent compared with 18 per cent).

Professor Theresa Marteau, director of Cambridge’s Behaviour and Health Research Unit, said: “E-cigarette marketing across Europe is regulated under the new EU Tobacco Products Directive, which came into effect on May 20 this year.

“The directive limits the exposure of children to TV and newspaper e-cigarette adverts.

“However, it does not cover advertising in the form of posters, leaflets, and adverts at point of sale, nor does it cover the content of marketing materials depicting e-cigarettes as glamorous or healthy.

“The findings from our study suggest these omissions could present a threat to the health of children.”

The research, funded by the Department of Health, was published in the journal Tobacco Control.

Young people exposed to vaping ads less likely to think occasional smoking is bad for health

Exposure to advertisements for e-cigarettes may decrease the perceived health risks of occasional tobacco smoking, suggests new research from the University of Cambridge, prompting concern that this may lead more young people to experiment with smoking.

http://www.cam.ac.uk/research/news/young-people-exposed-to-vaping-ads-less-likely-to-think-occasional-smoking-is-bad-for-health

Estimates suggest that among children who try smoking, between one third and one half are likely to become regular smokers within two to three years. However, young people are now more likely to experiment with e-cigarettes than they are with tobacco cigarettes. For example, a 2014 study found that 22% of children aged 11-15 in England had experimented with e-cigarettes, compared to 18% for tobacco cigarettes.

There is concern that the increasing exposure of children to e-cigarette adverts could be contributing to high rates of experimentation; in the US, adolescents’ exposure to e-cigarette adverts on TV more than trebled between 2011 to 2013. E-cigarette brands often market themselves as helping people quit smoking and as healthier and cheaper alternatives to tobacco cigarettes.

In this study from researchers at the Behaviour and Health Research Unit, University of Cambridge, and the University of North Carolina Gillings School of Global Public Health, and published today in the journal Tobacco Control, more than 400 English children aged 11-16 who had never smoked or ‘vaped’ previously were recruited and randomly allocated to one of three groups. One group was shown ten adverts that depicted e-cigarettes as glamorous, a second group was shown ten adverts that portrayed them as healthy, and a third control group was shown no adverts.

The children were then asked a series of questions aimed at determining their attitudes towards smoking and vaping. Children shown the adverts were no more or less likely than the control group to perceive tobacco smoking as appealing and all three groups understood that smoking more than ten cigarettes a day was harmful. However, both groups of children exposed to the e-cigarette adverts, both healthy and glamorous, were less likely to believe that smoking one or two tobacco cigarettes occasionally was harmful.

Dr Milica Vasiljevic from the Department of Public Health and Primary Care at the University of Cambridge says: “While we can be optimistic that the adverts don’t seem to make tobacco smoking more appealing to young people, they do appear to make occasional smoking seem less harmful. This is worrying, as we know that even occasional tobacco smoking is bad for your health, and young people who smoke occasionally believe they are somehow immune to its effects and do not feel the need to quit.”

The group of children that were shown adverts depicting e-cigarettes as glamorous also believed e-cigarette vaping to be more prevalent than did the other two groups.

Professor Theresa Marteau, Director of the Behaviour and Health Research Unit and a Fellow of Christ’s College, University of Cambridge, adds: “E-cigarette marketing across Europe is regulated under the new EU Tobacco Products Directive, which came into effect on the 20th May this year. The Directive limits the exposure of children to TV and newspaper e-cigarette adverts. However, it does not cover advertising in the form of posters, leaflets, and adverts at point of sale, nor does it cover the content of marketing materials depicting e-cigarettes as glamorous or healthy. The findings from our study suggest these omissions could present a threat to the health of children.”

The study was funded by the Department of Health.

E-cigarette advertisements are luring ex-smokers back to tobacco, warns Quit Victoria

Cancer Council research has shown the ads harm attempts to quit.

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/ecigarette-advertisements-are-luring-exsmokers-back-to-tobacco-warns-quit-victoria/news-story/1050fbfda65e814532591c503a224801?nk=ad8b3617ba5432f0a5bf0486b18c5027-1471041332

E-CIGARETTE advertising has the power to drive former smokers back to real cigarettes, new research has suggested.

While debate rages about whether the battery-powered cigarettes are a safe or effective way to quit smoking, a study of 800 former smokers has found advertising for the products had the opposite effect.

Findings of the Cancer Council study have prompted calls to ban e-cigarette promotions in the same way tobacco advertising was restricted decades ago.

Quit Victoria director Dr Sarah White said failing to ban e-cigarette advertising could undermine the resolve of former smokers as well as decades of gains since tobacco advertising was outlawed.

“Some of these ads look very much like people using a cigarette, (and) probably just watching people using that ¬motion doesn’t help former smokers suppress their urges,” she said.

E-cig ads can trigger ex-smoker’s urges, health authorities fear.

“We have lost hundreds of thousands of people to cigarettes, we have spent tens of millions of dollars trying to help people get off cigarettes that kill two out of three people, we have legislation in place to help people get off cigarettes, so we need to keep watch we are not letting something else come through that plays on the similarities.”

After showing 800 former smokers e-cigarette advertisements that had screened on television or online, the Cancer Council Victoria’s Centre for Behavioural Research in Cancer found their desire to start smoking normal cigarettes ¬returned, as did an urge to use e-cigarettes.

Results published in the journal Tobacco Regulatory Science showed twice as many former smokers felt a desire to smoke after watching the ads compared to those who viewed promotions for other products, while a quarter felt an “urge” to use tobacco.

Lead author, Associate Professor Sarah Durkin, said the e-cigarette ads were also found to adopt the same techniques as long outlawed tobacco ads, suggesting the products ¬increase a person’s social status and ¬romantic appeal, and portray users as “independent and ¬rebellious”.

“The e-cigarette finding is unsurprising, since the aim of these ads is to encourage people to use e-cigarettes,” she said.

“What is concerning is the e-cigarette ads also reminded former smokers of smoking ¬tobacco cigarettes, increased their desire to smoke tobacco cigarettes and reduced their confidence to abstain.”

grant.mcarthur@news.com.au

Flavored E-Cigarettes Being Marketed For Younger Population In China

E-cigarettes are the lesser of two evils when compared to its smoking brother– tobacco cigarette. For decades, we push people to quit and to help them control their addiction and then e-cigs were created to asset with that. But in China, it’s the other way around as people use e-cigs to actually lure in children to the habit of smoking.

The situation is worsening as China doesn’t have law in regulating ecigarettes.

Manufacturers are starting to present e-cigs to the younger population as a trend called “vaping”. They have a new target market with women, who has only 3% of China’s smoking population and it seems like they’re eyeing children as well.

China is currently the largest producer and consumer of tobacco. More than half of their men population smoke, which since then, started early in life. The countries average age for people who starts smoking is under 11 years old.

“Some campaigners worry that e-cigarettes are gaining popularity in China before awareness of tobacco’s dangers has become widespread,” reads the report.

Different flavors has been created to cater to the youngsters for a cheap cost of 15-20 Yuan or US $2.5 to 3 in China while more than 8,000 flavors are being marketed in Hong Kong for the same target market.

The group of concerned netizens pushes for a total ban of the product.

Even then, the United States had a heated argument for flavored e-cigs as well “Anyone who has only tried flavored e-cigs and then tries a real cigarette would likely be appalled at how harsh the smoke is and how bad it tastes,” a concerned netizen said while other said that “candy flavored e-cigs are designed to addict a new generation to nicotine.”

Smoking is highly associated to emphysema, lung cancer, prostate cancer, infertility, heart conditions, liver and renal diseases, gangrene and even more health problems.

Study finds e-cigarette marketing linked to teen e-cigarette use

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2016-05-e-cigarette-linked-teen.html

Exposure to e-cigarette marketing messages is significantly associated with e-cigarette use among middle school and high school students, according to researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). The study will be published in the June print edition of the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Using data from the 2014 National Youth Tobacco Survey, researchers found that youth were exposed to e-cigarette marketing messages through many channels: retail settings, internet, print, television and movies. Of the 22,007 middle and high school students who were surveyed, 20 percent had tried e-cigarettes before and 9 percent were current users.

Students who had tried e-cigarettes before were 16 percent more likely to have encountered an e-cigarette marketing message in print, retail settings, internet, television or movies compared to non-users. Further, current users of e-cigarettes were 22 percent more likely to have encountered one marketing message compared to non-users.

With each additional exposure to another channel of e-cigarette marketing, students’ odds of using e-cigarettes grew exponentially.

Half of the students reported seeing e-cigarette marketing messages in retail settings, making it the most common place they appeared, followed by messages on the internet at 40 percent.

“You go to a convenience store and the entire wall behind the cashier is tobacco advertising. We’re seeing e-cigarettes are following that trend. The internet and social media are also a concern because e-cigarette companies have a big presence online,” said Dale Mantey, M.P.A., lead author and predoctoral fellow at the Michael & Susan Dell Center for Healthy Living at UTHealth School of Public Health in Austin.

According to the paper, spending for e-cigarette marketing tripled from 2011 to 2012 from $6.4 million to $18.3 million and expenditures through the second quarter of 2013 outpaced all of 2012. Mantey said this reveals a trend that is not likely to change.

“E-cigarette companies are following what cigarette companies did. There are no restrictions on the messaging they can use, and health warnings do not appear on e-cigarettes like they do on cigarette packages. Flavored e-cigarettes are widely available and appeal to youth,” said Maria Cooper, Ph.D., co-author and postdoctoral fellow at the Center for Healthy Living.

The authors are members of the Tobacco Center of Regulatory Science on Youth & Young Adults (Texas TCORS), a center created to develop research that can guide future decisions on tobacco regulations at the national level. The researchers are examining how marketing messages from e-cigarette companies affect youth in Texas over several years. They also have plans to study the role that e-cigarette marketing plays on college campuses.

“While the current study is unable to definitively say e-cigarette marketing causes e-cigarette use, since data on exposure to advertising and e-cigarette use were collected at the same time, the longitudinal studies underway at the Texas TCORS will be equipped to answer such questions,” said Mantey.

Our tobacco laws just changed – here’s everything you need to know

http://metro.co.uk/2016/05/20/our-tobacco-laws-just-changed-heres-everything-you-need-to-know-5893582/

Major changes to tobacco laws have come into force today, May 20.

One of the most high-profile changes comes in the form of new standardised packaging – which will see all cigarette cartons be the same drab green colour.

At the same time, we are now no longer able to get 10-packs of cigarettes (sorry social smokers) – and we can start saying goodbye to menthol smokes.

There’s a lot to take in with the new laws, so we’ve put it all together for you.

Wait, what is this new law?

It is officially known as the Tobacco and Related Products Regulations 2016, which is part of the EU’s Tobacco Products Directive (or TPD for short).

Basically it’s an overhaul of our laws around the sale, advertising and packaging of tobacco products, such as cigarettes and vapes.

What’s happening to cigarette packaging?

The introduction of standardised, plain packaging is a major success for smoking health campaigners.

Under the new law, all cigarette boxes will be one uniform colour – a dull green – and will be the exact same size and shape.

New cigarette packaging laws are coming into force today, which means all boxes will have to be the same olive green colour, with the same font, colour, size, case and text appearance. Dr Nick Hopkinson, spokesperson for the British Lung Foundation, says evidence shows plain packaging works to cut smoking

All of the fonts will now be a standardised too, as will the colour, size, case and alignment of any text.

And logos will be strictly prohibited (a fact that caused particular contention with four tobacco giants).

They will also have much larger health warnings which, with a graphic picture and text, will take up 65 per cent of the front and the back of the boxes.

Campaigners from Action on Smoking and Health (ASH) and Cancer Research have hailed the packaging change as a victory, mainly because of… well, this.

Shops now have a year to get rid of the boxes they still have, before they’re totally replaced in May 2017.

I usually smoke menthols, they’re okay right?

Nope – from today menthols are going to be phased out, ready for a total ban in May 2020.

Deborah Arnott, chief executive of ASH, told Metro.co.uk: ‘There is evidence to show that menthol in cigarettes makes it easier for children to try smoking and to become addicted regular smokers.

‘That’s why ASH supports the ban on menthol cigarettes.’

Did you say I can’t buy 10-packs anymore?

Yep – the cheap 10-packs of cigarettes are now withdrawn from production.

Shops and companies now have a year to basically sell up stock, before they’re totally replaced in May 2017.

It’s hoped that by getting rid of the small, cheap packets, fewer people will be tempted to take up smoking.

You also won’t be able to buy bags of loose tobacco that weigh less than 30g.

What about my lite, organic, all-natural smokes?

Stop right there! Cigarettes that are branded ‘lite’, ‘natural’ and ‘organic’ are now a thing of the past.

This is because these descriptors are actually pretty misleading, making you subconsciously think that type of cigarette is healthy.

What about shisha and other flavoured tobacco?

Flavoured tobacco is now banned outright.

However shisha, aka hookah or water pipe, is exempt from this ban.

A Department of Health spokeswoman told Metro.co.uk that this is because shisha tobacco doesn’t sell in high enough volumes to merit being outlawed completely.

But shisha tobacco will now be subject to the same packaging laws as explained above.

What about e-cigarettes?

E-cigarettes are now subject to a whole new set of regulations.

For example, the advertising of vapes is now almost totally banned.

Plus, any e-cigs with a nicotine concentration above 20mg/ml will need to be licensed as a medicine and therefore subject to the same strict regulations as over-the-counter drugs.

IMA condemns use and sale of e-cigarettes

http://www.merinews.com/article/ima-condemns-use-and-sale-of-e-cigarettes/15916121.shtml

Electronic cigarettes or e-cigarettes are a type of electronic nicotine delivery system, which are much in rage today as alternatives to cigarettes. The younger generation is increasingly switching to e-cigarettes because they feel that they are safe to use, less harmful than normal cigarette smoking and satisfy their cravings.

The recent regulation on e-cigarettes by the FDA restricting its sale and promotion to the younger generation proves otherwise. Welcoming the move, the Indian Medical Association is running a mass awareness campaign educating the masses about the dangers of e-cigarettes and dispelling common myths, which state that e-cigarettes are safe and nicotine free.

E-cigarettes are battery-operated devices that heat a liquid to produce a vapour that the user inhales. Unlike conventional cigarettes, which burn tobacco and generate smoke, e-cigarettes have a cartridge containing a liquid which contains nicotine and other constituents.

In Focus

The liquid is heated to produce a vapour the user inhales. Unlike conventional cigarettes, e-cigarettes can be sold with flavorings. More than 7000 flavours are available, including candy, fruit, soda, and alcohol flavors. Flavorings may increase the attractiveness of e-cigarettes to youths, especially those who are not already smokers.

Speaking about the same, Dr SS Agarwal, National President IMA & Dr KK Aggarwal, Honorary Secretary General IMA in a statement said, “Nicotine exposure from e-cigarette use, as with cigarette smoking, increases heart rate and produces measurable levels of blood cotinine, a nicotine metabolite. Experienced e-cigarette users tend to take longer puffs and use the device more intensively compared with novice users. As a consequence, they have higher blood nicotine levels that more closely resemble the levels achieved by smoking conventional cigarettes.”

They added, “Similar to cigarette smoke, e-cigarette vapour contains particles. It is not known whether the particles in e-cigarette vapour have any toxicity. IMA, therefore, does not advocate e-cigarettes as an effective way to reduce smoking cessation and believe that they are as harmful as normal cigarettes and must not be promoted.”

Given the concerns that e-cigarette use may be a gateway to nicotine dependence in adolescents, many public health authorities have recommended restricting e-cigarette marketing and advertising to youth, much in the same way that conventional cigarette smoking advertising is restricted. The nicotine in e-cigarette fluid poses a potential for accidental ingestion, especially by children.

E-cigarettes have been banned in some countries (including Brazil, Singapore, Canada, and Uruguay). In Europe, the European Parliament approved a directive that regulates nicotine-containing e-cigarettes with concentrations up to 20mg/mL as tobacco products E-cigarettes with higher nicotine concentrations are regulated as medical devices.

As per WHO, regulations are needed to stop promotion of e-cigarettes to nonsmokers and young people, minimise potential health risks to users and nonusers, stop unproven health claims about e-cigarettes, and protect existing tobacco control efforts.

Tobacco Firms Lose Packet Legal Challenge

The European Court of Justice dismisses the final legal challenge to EU rules which aim to stop youngsters from starting smoking.

http://news.sky.com/story/tobacco-firms-lose-packet-legal-challenge-10268916

Europe’s highest court has rejected a legal challenge by tobacco firms against standardised packaging rules for cigarettes.

The ruling, at the European Court of Justice, essentially dismissed complaints that changes to EU laws went beyond what was necessary on health grounds.

It also paves the way for member states to impose further requirements such as plain packaging measures proposed in the UK, France and Ireland.

In addition, the ruling removes legal barriers to the banning of menthol cigarettes from 2020 and also electronic cigarette advertising.

The updated Tobacco Products Directive will take effect on 20 May though cigarette retailers will have a year to sell off their remaining stocks before the standardised packaging rules take effect.

They are designed to make the cartons less attractive to youngsters – with health warnings more prominent and covering 65% of a packet.

The EU hopes the move will cut smoking numbers by 2.4 million and prevent 700,000 premature deaths.

A separate legal challenge by tobacco firms against UK Government plans to remove all branding from cigarette packs is due to be heard on 18 May at the High Court and could be subject to appeal.

The packaging case against the EU was brought to by Philip Morris International, the maker of Marlboro, and the firm behind Rothmans and Benson & Hedges, British American Tobacco.

They argued that the bloc was abusing its authority.

But the ruling said: “The court finds that, in providing that each unit packet and the outside packaging must carry health warnings … the EU legislature did not go beyond the limits of what is appropriate and necessary”.

The Directive was due to be introduced in 2014 but was held up in the courts.

Deborah Arnott, chief executive of the anti-smoking charity Ash, welcomed the ruling.

She said: “We (now) await the UK court judgement, which is expected shortly, but we are optimistic that the court will confirm that the introduction of standardised packaging in the UK is lawful.

“From 20 May, all packs manufactured for sale in the UK will have to be plain, standardised, in the same drab green colour with the product name on the pack in a standard font”.

A spokesman for British American Tobacco said: “The reality is that many elements of the directive are disproportionate, distort competition and fail to respect the autonomy of member states.”

Tougher Rules On Electronic Cigarettes: European Court

http://www.ndtv.com/world-news/tougher-rules-on-electronic-cigarettes-european-court-1402713

Brussels: The European Union’s top court has approved new rules requiring plain cigarette packs, banning menthol cigarettes and regulating the growing electronic cigarette market.

Tobacco companies had protested a 2014 EU tobacco directive, calling it disproportionate. But the European Court of Justice today ruled the directive is in line with efforts to protect public health.

The court upheld a ban on menthol and other flavorings that make tobacco more appealing. The directive also requires standardized, plain labels that cover cigarette packs at least 65 percent with health warnings.

The rules will require warnings for e-cigarettes, limit their nicotine levels to 20 grams and restrict advertising and sponsorship by their makers.

The Independent British Vape Trade Association argued the ruling could push some e-cigarette smokers back to tobacco.

EU’s highest court upholds new restrictive law on cigarettes

http://english.vietnamnet.vn/fms/world-news/155936/eu-s-highest-court-upholds-new-restrictive-law-on-cigarettes.html

Europe’s highest court on Wednesday upheld a tough EU law on standardizing cigarette packaging and banning advertising of e-cigarettes, paving the way for its adoption later this month.

The court rejected a legal challenge brought by Philip Morris International and British American Tobacco, with Japan Tobacco International and Imperial Brands acting as interested parties.

“The court finds that, in providing that each unit packet and the outside packaging must carry health warnings…. the EU legislature did not go beyond the limits of what is appropriate and necessary,” the court said.